Acosta Research

Charles Acosta

Office: SC346 | Phone: (859) 572-5300
E-mail: acostac@nku.edu

Dr. Acosta studies community ecology and populations of key species in aquatic ecosystems.  His students have focused their research on applications to conservation science and resource sustainability.  Dr. Acosta is currently studying invasive dynamics of crayfish, modeling fishing impacts on Caribbean lobsters, and dcoumenting biodiversity patterns on coral reefs.

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Bowling Research

Bethany Bowling

Office: SL 412 | Phone: (859) 572-5415
E-mail: bowlingb2@nku.edu

Dr. Bowling's research interests focus on effective practices in genetics education, student misconceptions in genetics, and the incorporation of bioinformatics into genetics curricula.  Some of her recent work has broadened into student success in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) programs and initiatives to increase retention such as peer mentors and early undergraduate research opportunities.

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Boyce Research

Richard Boyce

Office: SC 150 | Phone: (859) 572-1407
E-mail: boycer@nku.edu

Dr. Boyce research areas include the factors driving "bark-stripping" in the Rocky Mountain bristlecone pinecanopy uptake and allocation of nitrogen by conifers, the ecophysiology or red cedar, the effect of invasive Amur honeysuckle on forest understory herbs, the effects of calcium deficiency on tree ecophysiology, and the developoment of Fuzy Set Ordination (FSO) for use with plant community data.
 

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Carmen Research

John Carmen

Office: SC 352 | (859) 572-19281407
E-mail: carmenj1@nku.edu  

Dr. Carmen studies a variety of topics related to microorganisms that cause disease in humans.  Currently, his students are investigating the molecular processes that regulate the ability of fungi like Saccharomyces cerevisiae (A and B), Candid albicans (C) ,and Histoplasma capsulatum to change their shape from yeast to pseudohyphal or hyphal forms.  Students have also successfully isolated antimicrobial-producing microbes from different environmental samples in a bioprospecting project designed to identify potential new antibiotics (D and E).

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Cooper

Joshua Cooper

Office: SC 352 | (859) 572-1965
E-mail: cooperjo@nku.edu

Dr. Cooper's research interests are centered around understanding the diversity , evolution, and physiological ecology of eukaryotic algae and their neighboring microbes in freshwater ecosystems.  Additional projects include documenting and describing the diatom diversity of our local and regional watersheds.  Dr. Cooper is in the process of curating and describing species from Ecuador housed in the NKU Diatom Herbarium collection.

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Curran

Chris Curran

Office: SC 344 | (859) 572-6914
E-mail: curranc1@nku.edu

Dr. Curran's research interests are in the area of developmental neurotoxicology, gene-environment interactions, persistent organic pollutants, traffic-related air pollution, microbiome, and energy drink toxicity.

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Dahlem

Greg Dahlem

Office: SC 349 / (859) 572-5733
E-mail: dahlem@nku.edu

Dr. Dahlem's research focuses on the identification, evolution and behavior of flies; forensic entomology; and microscopic photgraphy of insects.
 

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Durtsche

Dick Durtsche

Office: SC 148 | (859) 572-6637
E-mail: durtsche@nku.edu  

Dr. Durtsche is a physiological ecologist and herpetologist.  His research interests are primarily focused on nutritional ecology and digestive physiology of amphibians and reptiles; impacts of invasive species on amphibian larvae and niche occupancy of introduced reptiles; and the development of mobile technologies for bio assessment of aquatic ecosystems.  All of his research activities include undergraduate students at both local and international locations, as well as the lab.

KHOP

Kristy Hopfensperger

Office: SC 247 | (859) 572-5305
E-mail: hopfenspek1@nku.edu 

Dr. Hopfensperger's research is driven by the curiosity to better understand the relationships between community dynamics and ecosystem processes in response to human distrubrances - in both terrerstrial and aquatic communities.  Her current research includes habitat restoration, nutirient cycling, greenhouse gas emmissions, and invasive species.

Mester

Joe Mester

Office: SC 244 | (859) 572-5277
E-mail: mesterj1@nku.edu 

Dr. Mester's research interests are related to immune response to viral components, immune modulation by botanical extracts, and immune response in prion mediated and Alzheimer's diseases.

Schultheis

Patrick Schultheis

Office: SC 204E | (859) 572-5933
E-mail: schultheisp@nku.edu 

Dr. Schultheis studies cellular and physiological function of P5 - transport ATPases including their role in neurodegenerative disorders.

Schwarz

Kirsten Schwarz

Office: SC 347 | (859) 572-5303
E-mail: schwarzk1@nku.edu

Dr. Schwarz' research includes studying the distribution of environmental amenities and disamentieis in cities, integrating urban ecology, coupled natural-human systems, and environmental justice.

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Emily Shifley

Office: SC 354 | (859) 572-51409
E-mail: shifleye1@nku.edu

Dr. Shifley's research is focused on understanding how organs develop in the early vertebrate embryo.  She uses African clawed frogs, Xenopus laevls, as model organisms to discover the genetic signatls that coordinate proper embryonic development.  Her research can help explain why certain birth defects occur and help inform research aimed at directing stem cells into specific lineages for therapeutic purposes.

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Erin Strome

Office: FH 359G | (859) 572-6635
E-mail: stromee1@nku.edu

Dr. Strome's research is centered around studying genes involved in regulating genome stability.  Her gole is to discover genes whose human homologs might be studied for their roles in cancer incidence.

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DAVID THOMPSON

Office: SC 246 | (859) 572-5301
E-mail: thompsone1@nku.edu

Research projects in Dr. Thompson's laboratory examine the physiological and toxicological implications concerning waterborne metals and organic herbicides.

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Lindsey Walters

Office: SC 345 | (859) 572-6390
E-mail: waltersl3@nku.edu

As a behavioral ecologist and ornithologist, Dr. Walters research is focused on studying the reproductive behavior of wild cavity-nesting birds.

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Maggie Whitson

Office: SC 101B | (859) 572-1411
E-mail: whitsonma@nku.edu

Dr. Whitson's interests include Kentucky flora, systematics of the genus Physalis (Solanaceae), and databasing the John W. Theiret Herbarium collections.

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Lauren Williamson

Office: FH 359F | (859) 572-1949
E-mail: williamsol6@nku.edu

Dr. Williamson's research focuses on the relationship between the brain and the immune system, particularly in relation to learning and memory.  She uses lab rats as her model organism to study the effects of early-life inflammation on cognitive function in adulthood.

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