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Literary and cultural studies
ENG 200 Understanding Literature
Understanding Literature

 

Understanding Literature

ENG 200-002
TR 9:25 am -10:40 am - Green

This course will enable students to understand multiple perspectives and identities through the study of fiction, poetry, drama, and visual narrative. Authors to be studied may include: Herman Melville, Jamaica Kincaid, Emily Dickinson, William Shakespeare, and T.S. Eliot. 

FULFILLS: Culture & Creativity Gen Ed, Core Course for English Majors.


ENG 200-001
Online Asynchronous – Walton 

The course will primarily look at the three major genres in literature. I half jokingly call it “mostly Irish” because for many of the examples of the three genres I have chosen Irish writers, because of my own interest in Ireland and Irish literature. The students read sections of Gulliver’s Travels, Dracula, and The Picture of Dorian Gray. These narratives will be supplemented with videos and discussions of various possible approaches to those narratives. Then, we move on to poetry and examine various elements of poetry and the poetic tradition, looking at many various writers and traditions from William Shakespeare to the writers of the Harlem Renaissance. We end with an examination of Tragedy and Comedy by reading, discussing and viewing selected videos of the plays Oedipus and Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest. We also discuss such far flung comic traditions as Slap Stick and Black Humor. I also offer many extra credit opportunities and encourage my students to bring in their own creative work. 

FULFILLS: Culture & Creativity Gen Ed, Core Course for English Majors.


 

ENG 200-003
TR 10:50 am - 12:05 pm – Soliday

ENG 200 will introduce students to English studies (what it is, why we do it, how it is useful) through studying a variety of genres (such as poetry, drama, fiction, and prose), periods, authors, styles, etc. Students should leave ENG 200 with a basic understanding of literary studies, including critical analysis, close reading, and writing about literature; a desire to read for pleasure; and basic skills in reading and critical interpretation. Texts may include Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Leslie Marmon Silko’s Ceremony, Doyle’s Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, and selected poetry.

FULFILLS: Culture & Creativity Gen Ed, Core Course for English Majors.

Survey of British Literature I
Survey of British Literature I

 

Survey of British Literature I

ENG 202-001
Online Asynchronous – Kent-Drury

Raymond William said that at any time, some components of culture were residual (from the past) and some were emergent (new and pointing toward growing, later importance). In this course, we study important concepts underlying the literature and culture of the medieval, renaissance, and 17th/18th century periods of British literature, focusing on materials that help us understand how literature functioned in the past, but also how we came to understand ourselves as “modern.” We also consider materials you will not study in later courses, but which will help you understand materials you will encounter later in your academic study of literature. as well as why people resort to literature to explain what exceeds humans to comprehend and express the inexpressible--in other words, how humans persist, and how imaginitive thinking exceeds understanding. Come join us. 

FULFILLS: Core Course for English Majors and English Secondary Education Majors

 

Survey of British Literature II
Survey of British Literature II

 

Survey of British Literature II

ENG 203-001
MWF 10:00 am - 10:50 am – Gazzaniga 

In this course we will read a selection of poetry, prose, and drama from four British literary periods: Romantic, Victorian, Modern, and Post-Modern. We will pay close attention to how different literary genres and modes register contemporaneous cultural, political, and philosophical debates. The goal of the course is to provide you with a general understanding of how British literature developed from the late eighteenth-century to the present age and to develop your ability to closely read and analyze some of the most remarkable works written in the English language. Authors we will read include: William Wordsworth, John Keats, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Virginia Woolf, and Salman Rushdie, among many others. 

FULFILLS: Core Course for English Majors and English Secondary Education Majors 

Survey of American Literature I
Survey of American Literature I

 

Survey of American Literature I

ENG 208-001
Online Asynchronous – Walton 

In this course students will understand the concepts that inform the development of American literature in both their socio/historical and literary contexts through the Colonial, Federalist, and Romantic periods and gain familiarity with the major authors and works of these periods. Students will also synthesize understanding of the literature and the culture of the pre-Civil War United States and, by extension, the aesthetics associated with the Native American oral tradition, the Puritan tradition, the Enlightenment, and Romanticism through group work, oral presentations, and/or written assignments, which could include reaction papers and critical analyses as well as library and internet research using MLA format. 

FULFILLS: Core Course for English Majors and Group A in English Education Track

Survey of American Literature II
Survey of American Literature II 

 

Survey of American Literature II

ENG 209-001
TR 10:50-12:05 – Soliday

This course introduces students to the genres of poetry, drama, novel, and short story from the Civil War to the present. Course readings will feature works by men and women authors reflecting diverse ethnic, regional, class, and racial backgrounds. These readings help illustrate how all segments of the American populace have contributed to form our culture, and specifically American literature.

FULFILLS: Culture & Creativity Gen Ed, Core Course for English Majors.


 

Global Viewpoints
Global Viewpoints

 

Global Viewpoints

ENG 213-001
Online Asynchronous - Smith

In the contemporary world, political and social upheaval increasingly impinge on personal lives. Writers from around the world have engaged this issue, writing novels and stories that explore how personal trauma is interlaced with political and social disruptions in various cultures and among various nationalities and ethnicities. This course will explore the intersection of political and personal trauma in novels and short stories written in English, but taking place in varied global settings. The list of works to be read and studied include: Edwidge Dandicat: Krik? Krak! (1996); Mohsin Hamid: Exit West (2017); Viet Thanh Nguyen: The Refugees (2017); Yoko Ogawa: The Memory Police (2020 translation); Michael Ondaatje: Warlight (2018).

FULFILLS: Global Viewpoints Gen Ed

Western World Literature IWestern World Literature I

Western World Literature I

ENG 206-001
Online Asynchronous - Kent-Drury

Before the evolution of nation-states--like Great Britain, the United
States, and other “national” states , the idea of history was different. European societies saw themselves as the inheritors of Greek and Roman societies, informed by later Judeo-Christian belief. In other words--they saw
history and its literary traditions as their own, collapsed into the present
moment--not as “native” to them, but as the basis of their “own” literatures. In this course, we study what this meant to people of the classical
(Greek and Roman); Medieval; and Renaissance periods, with a focus on
what European influences and concepts teach us about later British and
American traditions. Our goal is to understand how the traditions of British and American literatures were formed from past and contemporary
influences, and why, while building a basis for understanding materials
you will study in later courses. Come join us.

FULFILLS: Group B in English Education Track and Group A in Literary and
Cultural Studies Track

Literature and Film: MysteryLiterature and Film: Mystery

Literature and Film: Mystery

ENG 302-002
Online Asynchronous – Soliday

This class will explore the concept of mystery in narrative; during the semester we will consider the relationship between literature and film and discuss how literary works are adapted to film. We will cover classic texts ranging from Raymond Chandler to Agatha Christie and characters ranging from Sherlock Holmes to Harry Potter. Part of the class also will involve students choosing films in which to explore the concept of
mystery.

FULFILLS: Culture & Creativity Gen Ed, Cinema Studies minor, and counts towards the
required 45 hours of upper-division credit hours


 

Literature and Film: Jane AustenLiterature and Film: Jane Austen 

Literature and Film: Jane Austen 

ENG 302-001
Online Asynchronous (1st 7 weeks) - Kent-Drury

In addition to their appearance on book lists for nearly 200 years, the works of Jane Austen continue to be read, studied, imitated, parodied, and rendered in film to the present day. What about these books has kept them continuously in print since they were written? And what makes their content updatable and popular to the present day in film and narrative adaptations? This course will explore women as writers and as the subjects of writing in 18th- and early 19th-century literature through the works of Jane Austen, as well as in the films that continue to interpret them for today’s audiences. We will also watch films that will help us to understand the cultural context within which the novels were written. Likely topics of discussion will include societal constructions of femininity, masculinity, and gender roles; men’s and women’s education; marriage and the family; class issues, including labor and poverty; and the increasingly global political context of Regency England. We will also touch on some of the aesthetic and philosophical concerns that seem both familiar and alien to readers today

FULFILLS: Culture & Creativity Gen Ed, Cinema Studies minor, and counts towards the required 45 hours of upper-division credit hours

 

Diverse Voices
Diverse Voices

 

Diverse Voices

ENG 307-001
Tues 1:40pm - 2:55pm - Yohe

In this section of the core course for the English major, Diverse Voices in English Studies, we will focus on Affrilachian Literature, aka works written by Black Appalachians. We will investigate the layers in the term Affrilachian from its origins in 1991, when Frank X Walker invented it, through the development of the group of Affrilachian Poets that began forming thereafter (initially, mainly at the University of Kentucky), up to the present day when APs have expanded to include others also writing from this cultural mindset in the wider region. We will examine how various works of fiction and poetry embrace the mantras of the
APs: “making the invisible visible” and “lending voice to the voiceless,”while they engage with seminal themes of family, cultural history, social justice, and connectedness to the land. We will read a novel by Crystal Wilkinson, as well as award-winning poetry and prose by Frank X Walker, Nikky Finney, Bianca Spriggs, and Keith S. Wilson, an NKU English alum and AP. Students will write papers and essay exams, deliver analytical presentations, and participate in and lead in-depth class discussions.

FULFILLS: Core Course for English Majors and counts towards the required 45 hours of
upper- division credit hours

Writers in Context: Irish Literary Renaissance
Writers in Context: Irish Literary Renaissance

 

Writers in Context: Irish Literary Renaissance

ENG 323-001
MW 2pm - 3:15pm - Walton

In the two decades before and the two decades after the turn of the century, some of the best writing in English was not written by the English – it was written by the Irish. This period, from about 1880 to about 1939 (the death of W.B. Yeats) marks what has been termed the Irish Literary Renaissance (or the Celtic Revival). During this time many young writers, especially W.B. Yeats, created a distinctly national literature for Ireland by giving authenticity to Irish history, legend and folklore as well as using Irish models for their creative work. This period saw a flowering of an Irish consciousness in the literary work of not only W.B Yeats, but also that of James Joyce, John Millington Synge, Lady Gregory, Sean O’Casey, Brian Friel and many others. It will be the aim of this class to introduce students to the lush literary and cultural legacy of modern Ireland and to sample the poetry, fiction, and drama of this remarkable time in Irish (and by extension “British”) letters. In addition, since the Irish literary tradition is so intimately connected with Ireland’s volatile political and cultural history, we will also look at the rich historical context of the rise of modern Ireland by meeting the giants of Ireland’s political history including Daniel O’Connell; Charles Stewart Parnell; Edward Carson; John Redmond; Michael Collins; Padraic Pearse and Eamon de Valera.

FULFILLS: Core Course for English Majors and counts towards the required 45 hours of
upper- division credit hours


 

Contemporary Literature
Contemperary Literature

 

Contemporary Literature

ENG 355-001
TR 9:25am -10:40am – Smith

What is being written, read, reviewed, and winning literary prizes in recent years and right now? This course will explore six contemporary American novels, and some examples of contemporary poetry, highlighting the diverse range of voices, subjects, characters, and literary experimentation taking place at present. Novels to be studied include Exit West (2017) by Mohsin Hamid; What Are You Going Through (2020) by Sigrid Nunez; Shuggie Bain (2020) by Douglas Stuart; Zorrie (2021) by Laird Hunt; The Boy in the Field (2021) by Margot Livesey; Hell of a Book (2021) by Jason Mott. In addition to committing to keep up with our assigned reading, students should expect
to participate in discussions (both in person and online), write short critical/analytical papers; and take a final exam.

FULFILLS: Group C on Literary and Cultural Studies track, elective for English Education
Track and counts towards the required 45 hours of upper-division credit hours


 

History of the English Language
History of the English Language 

 

History of the English Language

ENG 382 - 001

M 6:15pm - 9pm – O' Callaghan

his course provides an overview of the historical development of the
English language and an introduction to historical linguistics. We will
examine both the “internal” history—sounds and inflections—and the
“external” history—the political, social, and intellectual forces—that have
determined the course of that development at different periods. The emphasis of the course is on how understanding something of the history of
English can help us to understand its current (and future) changes and to
appreciate the power and politics of language in general.

FULFILLS: roup C in English Education Track and counts towards the required 45 hours of upper-division credit hours


 

Gender and Early Modern Literature
Gender and Early Modern Literature

 

Gender and Early Modern Literature

ENG 418 - 001
MWF 1pm - 1:50pm – Green

The early Modern period extends from 1500-1700 and includes some of the greatest works of dramatic literature (and not all of it written by Shakespeare). In this course we will read a selection of plays that feature a healthy dose of murder, revenge, magic, and madcap adventures. We will pay particular attention to how these plays upend traditional notions of masculinity and femininity. 

FULFILLS: Group B on Literary and Cultural Studies track, elective for English Education
Track and counts towards the required 45 hours of upper-division credit hours


 

Victorian Literature
Victorian Literature

 

Victorian Literature

ENG 452 - 001
TR 10:50-12:05 – Soliday

The Victorian period was a hothouse of new ideas and inventions in which the scope of time and space broadened at a mind-boggling pace. New theories of human origins and new instruments with which to see the universe—such as telescopes, microscopes and cameras—challenged perceptions of the world in new and terrifying ways. In addition, the Victorian period was called “the age of reform” because it ushered in progressive legislation that enfranchised more people outside the economically privileged classes, ensured more legal rights for women, and created more protections against oppressive labor practices. This course will focus on the poetry and novels composed and published during this period of constant change and enterprise. We will read works that emerge from a wide range of literary movements--from the Sensation Fiction of Mary Elizabeth Braddon’s Lady Audley’s Secret to the horror of Stoker’s
Dracula, with a healthy dose of the Brontë sisters in between. As we read through the period, we will keep in mind how social and cultural circumstances (such as gender, class, race, religion, industrialization, and British imperialism) shaped the Victorian individual and the modern era.

FULFILLS: Group C on Literary and Cultural Studies track, elective for English Education
Track and counts towards the required 45 hours of upper-division credit hours


 

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Creative Writing
Introduction to Creative Writing
Introduction to Creative Writing

 

Intruduction to Creative Writing

ENG 231 - 001
MWF 10am - 10:50am – Donahue

ENG 231 - 002
MWF 11am - 11:50am – Donahue

ENG 231 - 003
Online Asynchronous – Moffett

Have you ever read a poem, novel, or true story that has changed your life and thought, wow, I wish I could write something like that? Do you want to write creatively but are not sure where to begin? In this course, we focus on pleasure--what we love to read and write and more importantly, why. We investigate the methods and techniques that writers use to write and revise poems, fiction, and creative nonfiction, including the workshop method of sharing and critiquing. Our goal is to cultivate a passion for creative writing, as both readers and writers. Beginner and advanced writers are all welcome.

FULFILLS: Optional Core Course for English Majors


 

Introduction to Creative Writing
Fiction Writing

 

Fiction Writing

ENG 332 - 001
MWF 1pm - 1:50pm – Donahue

This workshop class provides an overview of modern fiction in its many forms, while also offering students an opportunity to explore and hone their own voice(s) as fiction writers. We’ll primarily read and write works of flash fiction and short stories but will also occasionally discuss novels. In these explorations, we’ll consider the ways in which craft choices affect our writing and how we can best hone our creative skills through
exploration, production, and revision (but never perfection!). Throughout the class, we’ll develop a strong writing community through small-group and in-person workshop, frequent responses to classmates’ works, and analyzing published works of fiction. We’ll explore different genres of fiction, with a strong emphasis on both realist and non-realist modes, and we’ll discuss publishing in the vast fiction landscape. Be prepared to invent wildly, fail miraculously, read extensively, and write voraciously

FULFILLS: Group A on Creative Writing Track and counts towards the required 45 hours of upper- division credit hours


 

Craft of Creative Writing
Craft of Creative Writing

 

Craft of Creative Writing

ENG 335 - 001
TR 10:50am - 12:05pm – Hindman

In the Craft of Creative Writing, we read contemporary works of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction in order to isolate techniques. We then imitate these techniques in a series of small-stakes exercises. Unlike in workshop, where writers submit polished works for critique, this course emphasizes reading for technique, craft analysis, and craft imitation. In addition, we will complete fun in-class writing exercises to get your creativity flowing. Readings will include the most recent editions of Best American Poetry, Best American Short Stories, Best American Essays, as well as shorter reading assignments on craft theory.

FULFILLS: Core Course option in the major and counts towards the required 45 hours of upper- division credit hours


 

Creative Nonfiction Writing
Creative Nonfiction Writing

 

Creative Nonfiction Writing

ENG 336 - 001
W 2pm - 4:45pm – Hindman

Have you ever wanted to write about a real-life experience that you have had? How do we make our own lives seem interesting on the page? How can we observe the real world around us in a way that is true to our emotions, and how do we transform these observations into art? In this course students will write, workshop, and revise works of creative nonfiction. To aid in our writing process, we will read contemporary works in the genres of personal essay, memoir, and literary reportage.

FULFILLS: Group A on Creative Writing Track and counts towards the required 45 hours of upper- division credit hours


 

Screenwriting
Screenwriting

 

Screenwriting

ENG 431 - 001
TR 10:40am - 12:05pm – Jones

The objective of this course is to develop an approach, a style, and a theory of the individual screenwriter’s method in creating a dramatic work.

FULFILLS: Group B on Creative Writing Track and counts towards the required 45 hours of upper- division credit hours


 

Advanced Poetry
Advanced Poetry Writing

 

Advanced Poetry Writing

ENG 430 - 001
TR 12:15pm - 1:30pm – Moffett

This course will explore the structure (and the history of the structure) of a poem. We will consider form as “already occupied” (Bakhtin) spaces, i.e. to write a sestina is to understand the history of the sestina and the practitioners who came before you. We will consult Boland and Strand’s The Making of a Poem and will write formal poetry up to midterm. After midterm, we will focus on what is being published now: free verse. We will read recent first collections of poetry by Donika Kelly, Amy Meng, and Kai Carlson-Wei to think about how the “ghost of form” is present in their free verse. We will also workshop your original free verse poetry. The course will culminate in a chapbook of your revised poetry.

FULFILLS: Group C on Creative Writing Track and counts towards the required 45 hours of upper- division credit hours


 

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Writing Studies
Introduction to Writing Studies
Introduction to Writing Studies

 

Introduction to Writing Studies

ENG 204 - 001
TR 1:40pm - 2:55pm – Cellio

Welcome to English 204, Introduction to Writing Studies. This course is designed to familiarize us with the rich history and diverse sub-fields contained under the banner of “writing studies.” As a declared subject or major, writing studies is relatively new at most universities; however, this newness belies thousands of years of thought and study about writing itself and the ways we “do” writing. As Charles Bazerman notes, “the study of writing is a major subset of the study of the history of human consciousness, institutions, practice, and development over the last five millennia; and composition—the learning and teaching of writing—is in the middle of all that.”

We will begin the semester by looking back to the origins of writing studies in America, focusing on a few events that continue to shape the field today. As the semester continues, we’ll investigate several key topics and theories that obtain across multiple sub-fields of writing studies, including rhetoric and composition, business and professional writing, and multimodal forms of composition. Together, we will consider issues like process vs. product, rhetoric and rhetorical situations, audience, style,
and visual rhetorics. At the end of the semester, we will take some time to think deeply about revision and to practice a few revision strategies.

FULFILLS: Core Course for English Majors


 

Writing for Social Change
Writing for Social Change

 

Writing for Social Change

ENG 338 - 001
M 4:45pm - 7:30pm – Wilkey

Students in this course meet regularly in Cincinnati’s Over-the-Rhine neighborhood while interacting with community activists as a way of examining and experiencing how everyday people use writing to work for social change and engage in activist work. Over-the-Rhine is well known for displaying many of the controversial issues associated with urban communities and continuing efforts to “revitalize” urban centers. This course will interrogate these issues in partnership with Over-the-Rhine community activists, residents, and organizations. Our class will learn from ongoing activist campaigns that advocate on behalf of individuals who either have little income or may be experiencing homelessness. In fact, our class has been asked to contribute to these ongoing efforts and to think through how they may take form for a wider, public education. In the process, students experience first-hand the practical power of using writing in alignment with the ongoing work of a social justice movement.

SERVICE LEARNING COMPONENT: Possible service learning projects include designing a “street newsletter”, creating a Display Board based on oral history interviews of neighborhood residents and workers, writing for Cincinnati’s street newspaper Streetvibes, and working with neighborhood residents and workers on their writing.

FULFILLS: Elective for Writing Studies track and counts towards the required 45 hours of upperdivision credit hours


 

Business Writing
Business Writing

 

Business Writing

ENG 340 - 001
Online Asynchronous – Bowers, T.

ENG 340 - 002
Online Asynchronous – Bowers, N.

Writing occurs in every type of business profession and business environment in existence today. Writing in and for the business situation involves producing various genres of documents in various delivery modes. Through this course, you will be introduced to, explore, and engage with documents for business including but not limited to proposals, reports, memos, emails, texts, and letters. While in the course, you will develop your ability to analyze various rhetorical situations common to business writing and produce the appropriate response (in terms of genre of document, style of writing, use of visuals, choice of deliver mode, etc.) to these situations. You will come to understand business writing through a rhetorical lens, especially in terms of recognizing how audience, exigence, purpose, organization, and delivery modes shape contemporary business writing practices. This course prepares you to write in any business situation.

FULFILLS: Optional core course, Group A course in Writing Studies Track, and counts towards the required 45 hours of upper-division credit hours


 

Technical Writing
Technical Writing

 

Technical Writing

ENG 347 - 001
Online Asynchronous – Bowers, T.

ENG 340 - 002
TR 1:40pm - 2:55pm – Bowers, N.

ENG 340 - 003
Online Asynchronous, 1st 7 weeks – Bowers, T.

Technical Writing is a specialized kind of writing commonly associated with the computer industry, but used in various technical fields and pertaining to products and processes of a technical nature. Through this course you will be introduced to and practice with various types of writing common to and used in contemporary technical professions including but not limited to descriptions, feasibility study/recommendation reports, instructions/instruction manuals, data displays, white paper, LCA (life cycle assessment), memos, and emails. During the course, you will develop your ability to analyze various rhetorical situations common to technical writing and produce the appropriate response (in terms of genre of document, style of writing, use of visuals, choice of delivery mode, etc.) to these situations. You will come to understand technical writing through a rhetorical lens, especially in terms of recognizing how audience, exigence, purpose, organization, and delivery mode shape contemporary technical writing practices. This course prepares you to write in any technical situation.

FULFILLS: Group A for Writing Studies, elective for English Education Track, and counts
towards the required 45 hours of upper-division credit hours

 

Professional Editing
Professional Editing

 

Professional Editing

ENG 348 - 001
Online Asynchronous – Bloch

 

FULFILLS: Group A for Writing Studies, elective for English Education Track, counts towards the required 45 hours of upper-division credit hours


 

Web Writing for Professions
Web Writing for Professions

 

Web Writing for Professions

ENG 349 - 001
Online Asynchronous – Bowers, T.

Web Writing in the Professions is designed to provide you with an introduction to the practices of generating content for organizational websites and for the various social media tools used by organizations. A major component of the course will be how the writing for such media and forms of communication balances the need for easy access to content while also providing readers with an engaging and persuasive text. You will practice with varying styles, document design, and images as a way to better understand the tension inherent in this form of writing. You will have the opportunity to put the concepts from the course into practice by
way of constructing a web project of your choice.

FULFILLS: Elective for Writing Studies track and counts towards the required 45 hours of upperdivision credit hours


 

Rhetorical Theories and Writing Practices
Rhetorical Theories and Writing Practices

 

Rhetorical Theories and Writing Practices

ENG 351 - 001
TR 12:15pm - 1:30pm – Wilkey

Rhetorical Theories and Writing Practices is designed to provide you with an introduction to the way rhetoric informs the production and reception of written texts. The focus of the course is not just on understanding these theories but also coming to understand how these theories impact the practice of writing. Central to class discussions and activities will be understanding the reasons and motives for writing, the role of rhetoric and writing in one’s public and professional life, and how writing shapes race, culture, and gender.

FULFILLS: Core Course for English Majors and counts towards the required 45 hours of
upper- division credit hours


 

Traditional Grammar
Traditional Gramar

 

Traditional Grammar

ENG 371 - 001
Online Asynchronous, 2nd 7 weeks – Bloch

This course provides an understanding of sentence parts and patterns, punctuation, usage, and sensitivity to style. Such instruction in traditional grammar can help students (a) write correctly and effectively, (b) apply logical thinking, (c) become wise analysts of texts, and (d) teach others conventional uses of language.

FULFILLS: Group A for Writing Studies, elective for English Education Track, Group B for Creative Writing Track, and counts towards the required 45 hours of upper-division credit hours

 

Cinema Studies
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Introduction to Cinema Studies
Introduction to Cinema Studies

 

Introduction to Cinema Studies

CIN 200 - 001
Online Asynchronous – Gazzaniga

This course introduces students to cinematic language and the basic tools of film analysis. We will examine how formal elements such as mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, and sound create meaning in films. We will also consider a variety of film genres, narrative styles, and artifacts of film movements across cinematic history. In addition to understanding the basic terminology of film production and form, students will examine key concepts of film theory and study how film reflects and constructs cultural ideologies. Films we will study may include: Double Indemnity, Rear Window, Breathless, The Graduate, Do the Right Thing, No Country for Old Men, Lost in Translation,The Hurt Locker, Jackie Brown, Grizzly Man,
Arrival.

FULFILLS: Core course in Cinema Studies Minor

 

Survey of U.S. Cinema
Survey of U.S. Cinema

 

Survey of U.S. Cinema

CIN 301 - 002
T 3:05pm - 5:50pm – Alberti

Explore the development of cinema in the United States from the early days of Kinetoscopes and thirty second films through the evolution of movie storytelling, the silent era, the Golden Age of the studio system, the upheavals of the 60s and 70s, up to the era of home entertainment and digital media. We will look at how movies work as part of the larger social and cultural history of the United States and how they have played a powerful role in changing ideas about gender, race, and sexuality. We will watch, talk, and write about a variety of influential and significant examples of US Cinema, such as Citizen Kane, Vertigo, The Godfather, Pulp Fiction, and Selma and learn about key figures in film history, such as Lois Weber, Alfred Hitchcock, Stephen Spielberg, and Kathryn Bigelow.

FULFILLS: Core course in Cinema Studies Minor

 

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