Charlotte Kalfas, Posters-at-the-Capitol, 2019

Charlotte Kalfas, Posters-at-the-Capitol, 2019

Analyzing the evolution of drug autobiographies over time to draw conclusions about best practice for engaging with the opioid epidemic in modern times.
 
Rachel Pipes, Posters-at-the-Capitol, 2019

Rachel Pipes, Posters-at-the-Capitol, 2019

Using legal research to rewrite the laws surrounding medical malpractice, which she argues currently weigh towards the physicians as opposed to the patients.
 
Shannon Foxton and Jozephine Bliss, National Conference on Undergraduate Research, 2018

Shannon Foxton and Jozephine Bliss, National Conference on Undergraduate Research, 2018

Transcribing the diaries of lesser known Victorian poets Michael Field, and showing what literary scholars can gain from reading their life-writing.
Sara Webster, KY Council of Teachers of English Conference, 2019

Sara Webster, KY Council of Teachers of English Conference, 2019

Using station learning to help students get excited about the process of editing essays, and make the process more enjoyable for students and teachers alike.
Onyinye Uwolloh, Six@Six: Moby-Dick Through a Nigerian Lens, 2019

Onyinye Uwolloh, Six@Six: Moby-Dick Through a Nigerian Lens, 2019

ExploringMoby Dick through haikus written in Pidgin English, as well as discussing Melville's story Benito Cereno, both analyses influenced by Onyi's Nigerian heritage.
Rachel Sizemore, Celebration of Student Research and Creative Activity, 2019

Rachel Sizemore, Celebration of Student Research and Creative Activity, 2019

AnalyzingFrankenstein through the lens of the Romantic sublime, Sizemore shows how Mary Shelley's gothic novel anticipates the toxic masculinity that has become an issue in contemporary society.
Charlotte Kalfas, National Conference on Undergraduate Research, 2019

Charlotte Kalfas, National Conference on Undergraduate Research, 2019

Looking atConfessions of an English Opium Eater as the seminal work in the subgenre of "Drug Autobiography," Kalfas situates this genre as a valuable sector of research in medical humanities.
Conferences & Presentations

As a student of English, your papers, projects, and discussions are contributing to a bigger conversation than just the other students in your class. One way to extend your papers into that global conversation in a tangible way is to present your work at conferences. On a small scale, you can submit your papers to NKU's very own Celebration of Student Research and Creative Activity. There are also opportunities outside of NKU's campus to perform and present scholarly research. The Institute for Student Research and Creative Activity, which hosts Celebration, has curated a list of opportunities for undergraduate students to present as well as advice on how to prepare once you've been accepted.

Below you can browse titles of presentations that students from our department have given, and get an idea of the wide variety of subjects our students are capable of taking on!

Presentations from NKU

Celebration of Student Research and Creative Activity

Other Conferences

The 29th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf

Anna Camele, “Virginia Woolf’s Feminism vs. Feminism Today”

Zorada Porter, "Pedagogy as Art: How Virginia Woolf Writes Fiction as Pedagogy”

Lauren Turner, “Gender Inequality in Virginia Woolf’s The Years: Rose and Martin”

Posters-at-the-Capitol

Charlotte Kalfas, "Already Addicted: 200 Years of Opioid Use & Abuse in Literature"

Rachel Pipes, "Medical Malpractice Reform: A Research Study and Proposed Bill Revisions on Repeat Offenders within Kentucky’s Healthcare System"

Kentucky Council of Teachers of English Conference

Sara Webster, "Blending the Editing & Revising Process with Station Learning"

National Conference on Undergraduate Research

Charlotte Kalfas, "Is the Pen Mightier than the Syringe? Revisiting Narratives of Addiction"

Jozephine Bliss & Shannon Foxton, "The Michael Field Diaries Digital Archive"

Charlotte Kalfas & Zorada Porter, "The Michael Field Diaries: Life-Writing as a Lens into the Fin-de-Siècle"

Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture since 1900

Rebecca Hudgins, “This place has wonderful powers”: The Force of Nature in Howards End

The 25th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf

Dakotah Kennedy, “Inequalities Revealed: Virginia Woolf ’s Orlando and Jean Rhys’ Good Morning Midnight"

Kaleigh White “Autobiography, Experimentation, and Women’s Experiences in Orlando and Good Morning, Midnight”

Ohio Valley Shakespeare Conference

Rebecca Hudgins, “My Lady’s Father”: Loss of Male Identity in King Lear.”