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The Common Experience is designed to foster a common, academic conversation and cultivates engagement between students, faculty and staff.

It is a yearlong experience featuring an overarching theme that is different each year. With the Common Experience, participants will explore thought-provoking material at both the personal and academic level. University-wide events and other opportunities related to the Common Experience will be held throughout the academic year to further build community and facilitate meaningful discussions.

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The goals of the NKU Common Experience are:

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Share and understand diverse perspectives in a constructive manner
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Build a community of engaged learners
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Explore the role we play in shaping society
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For first year students to connect with one another through discussion and yearlong programming
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2020-2021 Theme

Racial Inequities within America
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Common Reading Material

Racial Disparities in Health Status

By Ruqaiijah Yearby

This longer essay by Ruqaiijah Yearby addresses the continuing inequalities and “structural racism [that] prevents African Americans from obtaining equal access to resources such as wealth, employment, income, and healthcare, resulting in racial disparities in health.”

Read Now

The Missing Pieces of America's Education

By Joe Heim

This article by Joe Heim of The Washington Post brings together five noted historians to discuss the ways that “aspects of slavery are misunderstood, poorly taught, or not covered at all” in classrooms. The responses from historians address the whitewashing of textbooks and invite discussion of the ways that all academic disciplines support systemic racism..

Read Now

The Birth of American Music

By Nikole Hannah-Jones

This podcast is episode three in The New York Times’1619 audio series. The series is named for the year in which the first enslaved Africans were brought to American and the damage and violence  250 years of slavery that followed. This episode is described thus: “America heard the sound of complete artistic freedom in black music, and then claimed that music as its own. ‘And that’s ironic,’ Wesley Morris tells us. ‘Because this is the sound of a people who, for decades and centuries, have been denied freedom.’

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Events

Upcoming

Lecture Series Advertisement - Racial Disparities in Healthcare

2020 Calendar of Events

10/28/20 @ 3 p.m.
Lecture Series: Racial Health Disparities - From Tuskegee to COVID-19

A deeper look into the disparities within the healthcare system, both historically and today
Replay
9/30/20 @ 3 p.m.
Lecture Series: Media and Our Perceptions of Race

With an emphasis on information literacy, panelists discuss the inequties within media outlets and institutions and how they influence our ideas of race
Replay
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