NKU Chase Professor of Law Tackles Domestic Violence in Sports

By Ryan Clark
NKU Marketing + Communications

Ray Rice. Adrian Peterson. Hope Solo.

These athletes’ names have become synonymous with domestic violence, and it’s a topic on the minds of many Americans who follow their respective sports.

Sharlene Boltz, law professor at the NKU Chase College of Law, is ready to participate in some discussion on the matter —– more specifically at 5 p.m., Oct. 2 in the James C. and Rachel M. Votruba Student Union Ballroom, sections 107 B & C.

“I want to engage the audience and see how they feel about these issues, as well as educate on some topics,” Boltz says.

Boltz, who teaches, among other classes, Domestic Violence Law Seminar and Domestic Violence Prosecution and Trial, says she would like to first talk about the definition of domestic violence.

“Just a fast and furious overview,” Boltz says. “I want people to have a basic understanding of what the issues are.”

Sharlene Boltz Sharlene Boltz

 

About the Discussion

Domestic Violence in Sports

  • Thursday, Oct. 2
  • 5 p.m.
  • James C. and Rachel M. Votruba Student Union Ballroom, Sections 107 B&C
  • Open campus-wide

Please RSVP by Monday, Sept. 29 to Eric Robinson: robinsone4@mymail.nku.edu

Hosted by the Chase Sports and Entertainment Law Society and the Legal Association of Women

    

Second, Boltz wants to talk about the culture of sports in America, and the sense of entitlement that some athletes receive. She has a special perspective on the topic: her 18-year-old son is a talented track athlete at Penn.

“I see it as part of my responsibility to keep him grounded,” she says.

Lastly, Boltz says she wants people to know that domestic violence is a problem in society — not just a problem in sports.

“It permeates our society,” she says. “We focus on sports because we place athletes in role-model positions and the expectations on them are greater.”

She says she will also address the response of the NFL in the Rice case.

“I want to engage the audience,” she says. “We want some back-and-forth.”