Skip to main content

Summer Successes in the College of Education

The College of Education was busy this summer! Faculty, staff, and campus and community partners collaborated to provide several summer programs to incoming Norse, P-12 students and teachers in the community. These programs include the Adolescent Literacy Project, Camp Innovation Pathways to College Program, GRAD Cincinnati, Kentucky Reading Project and Summer Spark. Learn more about each program below.

 

Adolescent Literacy Project

Adolescent Literacy Project
Teachers from several high schools in Kenton and Boone Counties worked with Dr. Tammie Sherry and Dr. Mike DiCicco in late June for the Adolescent Literacy Project funded by the Collaborative Center for Literacy Development. English, history, and special education high school teachers met at Lloyd Memorial High School to read, write, and learn together and plan for the upcoming school year. The focus for this year’s institute was using mentor texts to guide teaching and learning, particularly around writing instruction.
cq-text-component-placeholder

Camp Innovation Pathways to College Program

Camp Innovation Pathways to College Program
Elementary students from throughout northern Kentucky attended this summer’s Camp Innovation Pathways to College Program through the Institute for Talent Development and Gifted Studies. Students explored and developed their critical and creative thinking skills through classes such as STEM Explorers, Have Fun and Lego, The Art of Encanto, Grossology, Ocean Adventures, Creative Thinking Adventures, and Harry Potter Art and Science for Muggles. Camp Innovation provides the opportunity for students to cultivate a passion for learning through transdisciplinary learning and technology integration. Look for our upcoming programs this fall!
cq-text-component-placeholder

GRAD Cincinnati

students
High school students from four Cincinnati Public Schools visited and stayed on NKU’s campus for three days this June to learn about opportunities available to them by attending college. Funded by 2020 Innovation Challenge and in conjunction with the nonprofit organization GRAD Cincinnati, students spent three days exploring college resources by living and learning on campus. They met with representatives from the various academic Colleges, along with Admissions, Student Financial Assistance, Diversity Outreach and Recruitment, and more. They ended the experience with collaborative presentations to showcase how NKU fits in with their college goals.
cq-text-component-placeholder

Kentucky Reading Project

students
The 24th NKU Kentucky Reading Project (KRP) held its two-week summer institute on NKU’s campus, working with Dr. Lynne Smith as director and Dawn Klus and Missy Day (both from Campbell County) as teacher leaders. NKU’s KRP is one of eight projects across the state funded by the Collaborative Center for Literacy Development at the University of Kentucky. KRP focuses on strengthening the literacy of students in grades K-5. In addition to the summer institute, participants develop an action plan to implement in their classrooms that addresses an instructional need or two as evidenced through test scores, student work and teacher observation. Participants also create a plan to increase family engagement in their students’ learning. Teachers from Walton-Verona, Kenton County, Bracken County, Ludlow, and Covington studied strategies for phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, comprehension, writing and parent engagement. In addition, they looked at issues of equity, providing assistance to struggling readers, and assessment. One highlight this summer was evaluating resources that examine highly effective literacy practices and brainstormed ways to create more instructional time. 
cq-text-component-placeholder

Summer Spark

Summer Spark Program
The College of Education, in conjunction with NKU and the Kentucky Department of Education (KDE), offered a five-week summer program, "Elevating Educators," to incoming freshmen to complement NKU’s Summer Spark program. Students interested in education as a career spent time focusing on all aspects of teaching, learning from community partners, speaking with P-12 partners, and looked at financial literacy and built community through various social activities. Students completed their first education class, EDU 104: Orientation to the Education Profession, with COE faculty member and Elevating Educators coordinator, Dr. Sara Runge. The group experienced in-the-community learning by visiting Dayton High School and the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center.

About This Article

NKU Magazine Staff
cq-text-component-placeholder
Published August 2022
Photography provided

Recent Features